News

August 10, 2007

SuperPower Announces New World Records In Wire And Magnet Technologies

By: by Traute F. Lehner, Marketing Manager, SuperPower

Source:

August 7, 2007 - Schenectady, NY - SuperPower, Inc. today reported a number of new milestone achievements and world record performance at the 2007 U. S. Department of Energy (DoE) Annual Peer Review in Superconductivity for Electric Systems in Arlington, Virginia. 

Philip J. Pellegrino, president of SuperPower, Inc., a subsidiary of Philips Holdings USA, said, "we are delighted to be able to report further improvements in the performance and length of second-generation high-temperature superconducting (2G HTS) wire we are routinely producing at our manufacturing facility in Schenectady, New York."

SuperPower announced production of the world's longest buffered wire to date.  Several wires, 1,350 meters long that include a complete buffer template stack with five nano-scale layers were produced and had an average in-plane texture of 6 to 7 degrees and a uniformity of 2 to 3 percent.  The layers in the buffered wire were produced at a speed of 350 meters/hour of 4 mm wide wire, which corresponds to an annual production capacity of 1400 kilometers/year if 45 percent of time in a year is used for deposition.  This achievement clearly demonstrates the long-length, high-throughput capability of SuperPower's pilot-scale wire manufacturing processes and brings SuperPower another step closer to producing kilometer lengths of complete 2G HTS wire.

Pellegrino remarked that "in addition to our achievements in wire performance and production lengths, further improvements in the areas of process speed, product throughput and materials cost reduction have enabled us to steadily reduce our pricing, with the goal of achieving price parity with copper by the end of this decade.  We are well on the way toward achieving that goal."

Having signaled the commercial-scale production of 2G HTS wire with a 9.7 kilometer delivery of wire to Sumitomo Electric Industries in December 2006, SuperPower has implemented a wire marketing campaign and reports that it has, in addition to the Sumitomo delivery and in addition to wire used in-house for a variety of device demonstrations, sold at market pricing more than 6.4 kilometers of its 4 mm wide equivalent 2G HTS wire since July 2006.  Customers include 25 research organizations, universities and commercial firms from around the globe with applications including cable, fault current limiter, magnet and a wide variety of other devices.

In other areas, SuperPower and project partner, Sumitomo Electric Industries (Osaka, Japan) reported the successful installation of the world's first 2G HTS cable in the utility system at National Grid.  This installation is the critical element in Phase II of the Albany HTS Cable Project.  Sumitomo fabricated the 30 meter long, 3-phase, fully shielded cable from the 9.7 kilometers of SuperPower 2G HTS Wire(tm) manufactured by SuperPower in Schenectady, New York and shipped to Osaka last December.  This remains the world's largest single delivery of 2G HTS wire to date. 

Once installation of the 2G HTS cable has been completed, a period of testing will follow and re-energization of the system is planned for November 2007, with an operation period of approximately six months.  During project Phase I the 350 meter system, that consisted of two 1G HTS cable sections, ran as expected and without incident for a total of 280 days (about 9 months) with no instances of the cable being taken out of service for any HTS cable system issues. 

SuperPower, in collaboration with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) at Florida State University, has demonstrated a new world record of 26.8 Tesla for a field created by a superconducting magnet (including low-temperature superconductors).  The HTS magnet coil, fabricated by SuperPower with SuperPower 2G HTS Wire(tm), and tested by NHMFL researchers, generated 26.8 Tesla in a background field of 19 Tesla at 4.2 Kelvin.  Without background field, the coil generated a field of 9.5 Tesla at 4.2 Kelvin, which is a world record for an HTS coil.  The new world-record field was more than 1.8 Tesla higher than the previous highest field of 25.0 Tesla that was achieved using a 1G coil in 2003.

"This test demonstrates what we had long hoped - that YBCO high-temperature superconductors being made now for electric utility applications also have great potential for high magnetic-field technology," said David Larbalestier, director of the Applied Superconductivity Center and chief materials scientist at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Florida State University.  "It seems likely that this conductor technology can be used to make all-superconducting magnets with fields that will soon exceed 30 Tesla.  This far exceeds the 22 to 23 Tesla limit of all previous Niobium-based superconducting magnets."  (Niobium is the material used to build most superconducting magnets.)

Along with its Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partner, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), SuperPower has been selected to receive the 2007 R&D 100 Award for its 2G HTS wire. The award was for a High Performance LMO-enabled, High Temperature Superconducting Wire, as one of the 100 most technologically significant products introduced into the marketplace over the past year.  This wire has the unique combination of strength, flexibility, fabricability, throughput, and low cost needed for power grid applications, including coils and motors.  The award will be presented to the inventors, Venkat Selvamanickam and Xuming Xiong of SuperPower, and Parans Paranthaman, Tolga Aytug and Amit Goyal of ORNL at the October 18, 2007 Awards Banquet in Chicago.

SuperPower, Inc. is a subsidiary of Philips Holdings USA, the US holding company for Royal Philips Electronics NV, following Philips' November 2006 acquisition of Intermagnetics General Corporation.  SuperPower was formed in March 2000 by Intermagnetics to provide a strong focus for the development and commercialization of HTS technology for the energy technology sector. To learn more, visit http://www.superpower-inc.com/.

 

The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) at Florida State University in Tallahassee, Florida, develops and operates state-of-the-art, high-magnetic-field facilities that faculty and visiting scientists and engineers use for research. The laboratory is sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the state of Florida. To learn more, visit http://www.magnet.fsu.edu/.