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CNSE's Solar Energy Development Center

CNSE’s Solar Energy Development Center, located in Halfmoon, New York, is an integral component of the CNSE green energy initiative that further expands CNSE’s growing portfolio of clean energy research, development and commercialization and creates new opportunities to retain and grow New York’s high-tech, green collar workforce.

The 18,000-square-foot CNSE Halfmoon facility features a state-of-the-art, 100 kilowatt prototyping and demonstration line for next-generation copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) thin film solar cells. With the ability to be manufactured at lower cost on both glass and flexible substrates, while significantly improving energy efficiency and reducing the cost of installation to less than $1 per watt, CIGS-based cells offer great promise to dominate the market for building integrated materials, including commercial and residential rooftops, among applications ranging from solar farms to portable devices.

The facility provides a pilot line for proof-of-concept prototyping, offering critical opportunities to demonstrate emerging concepts in CIGS manufacturing, such as evaluations of innovative materials and novel processes. Preliminary performance data can be obtained prior to engaging a full-scale manufacturing line, allowing for the acceleration of emerging concepts in CIGS cell manufacturing at a lower cost and with reduced risk.

The advanced work done at CNSE’s Solar Energy Development Center also supports the U.S. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consortium, a more than $300 million public-private collaboration headquartered at CNSE. Created as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) SunShot Initiative, the PVMC is a partnership between CNSE and SEMATECH that will engage more than 40 companies and organizations from throughout the solar community to work cooperatively to increase the performance of CIGS solar cells while driving down the cost and risk of bringing them to the marketplace.